Guide To Chess Improvement: The Best Of Novice Nook

Ref: p4649

Acknowledgements 5
Introduction 7
1 General Improvement 11
1-1 The Theory of Chess Improvement 12
1-2 An Improvement Plan 21
1-2.1 Practice (The Road to Carnegie Hall) 21
1-2.2 Theory 26
1-2.3 Chess Books and Prerequisites 33
1-3 Reviewing Chess Games 35
1-4 The Big Five 42
1-5 Getting the Edge 54
1-6 Finding a Good Instructor 64
2 Thought Process 71
2-1 Making Chess Simple 72
2-2 The Goal Each Move 84
2-3 Real Chess, Time Management, and Care 92
2-4 Analysis and Evaluation 95
2-5 Improving Analysis Skills 107
2-6 The Principle of Tactical Dominance 119
2-7 The Fun of Pros and Cons 127
2-8 Ask the Right Questions 140
3 Time Management 149
3-1 The Case for Time Management 150
3-2 The Two Move Triggers 158
4 Skills and Psychology 168
4-1 Traits of a Good Chess Player 169
4-2 Chess, Learning, and Fun 175
4-3 Breaking Down Barriers 181
4-4 The Three Types of Chess Vision 187
5 Tactics and Safety 193
5-1 A Different Approach to Studying Tactics 194
5-2 When is a King Safe? 199
5-3 Is it Safe? 209
5-4 Is it Safe? Quiz 237
5-5 The Two Types of Counting Problems 243
6 Openings 250
6-1 Learning Opening Lines and Ideas 251
7 Endgames and Technique 265
7-1 Trading Pawns When Ahead 266
7-2 The Endgame Bind 272
7-3 When You're Winning, It's a Whole Different Game 279
7-4 The Margin for Error 291
8 Strategy and Positional Play 299
8-1 Strong Principles vs. Important Principles 300
8-2 The Most Important Strategic Decisions 311
8-3 The Six Common Chess States 319
8-4 Break Moves: Opening Lines to Create Mobility 323
8-5 It's Not Really Winning a Tempo! 332
8-6 The Principle of Symmetry 346
9 Shorter, Lesson Material 355
9-1 A Fistful of Lessons 356
9-2 Examples of Chess Logic 365
9-3 Odds and Ends 374